Starting a Business Around GPT-3 is a Bad Idea

GPT-3 is an amazing technology. Within a few weeks after beta API access opened, a host of jaw-dropping demos popped up, from automatic code generation to automated therapy bots to writing original poetry and Navy SEAL copypasta memes. It does things that would have been science fiction 10 years ago. GPT-3 and its successor algorithms are going to change entire industries. Naturally, tech founders and VC investors are salivating at the possibilities of turning GPT-3 applications into businesses. But a good technology doesn’t necessarily make for a good business. The fact that GPT-3 works so well out of the box should

We Stopped Arguing About Chores After Making One Spreadsheet

We Stopped Arguing About Chores After Making One Spreadsheet

If you live with someone, tell me if any of this sounds familiar: One person feels they do more chores than the other person. When one person’s doing chores, they get annoyed when the other person’s just sitting on the couch, even if the other person has promised to do chores some other time. You argue about whether chores were actually done or not. All this friction simmers as resentment that flares up once in a while. These tensions are common between people living together, whether that’s between roommates, romantic partners, or families. If you’ve had lingering issues about this,

Best Summary: Never Split the Difference, by Chris Voss

Best Summary: Never Split the Difference, by Chris Voss

Never Split the Difference argues that emotion, not logic, determines the success or failure of negotiations. Being emotionally intelligent and empathetic is how you draw the crucial information out of your counterpart that gives you a decisive advantage. You get what you want by gaining a deeper understanding of what they want.

This approach flies in the face of a lot of traditional, old-school negotiating theories. Never Split the Difference argues that rational self-interest, win-win negotiating, getting to yes, and other traditional negotiating concepts are incomplete—they ignore the actual human beings doing the negotiating. We’re not robots, precisely calculating our best interests and formulating rational offers and counter-offers designed to maximize our utility.